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Radio Shows | Is Tanning Ever Safe? | mp3wmawav

You may be daydreaming about that island vacation or cruise- in fact you may already have a date with your favorite tanning salon so you can look the part.

We'll bet the last thing on your mind is skin cancer.

Sure - you know the sun's ultraviolet rays can hurt you but what about those tanning beds?

The tanning industry would have you believe artificial tanning is safe. But, credible scientific reports show tanning beds increase the risk of two of the most common forms of skin cancer. Together, they make up the most cancers in the US.

For example, women who use tanning beds more than once a month are 55 percent more likely to develop malignant melanoma. That's the deadliest form of skin cancer?

So if your teenager wants to buy a $18-a-month, unlimited pass to the tanning salon, just say NO.

UV rays are divided into 3 ranges: UV-A, UV-B and UV-C. Some UV is necessary for good health because our bodies need it to make vitamin D. But, most UV, especially UV-B which comes from the sun, causes harm. Tanning salons use beds that emit mostly long wave UV-A rays. They claim it's safer.

But the truth is UV-A is also harmful While UV-B rays can burn the outer layer of skin, UV-A rays penetrate to weaken the skin's inner connective tissue.

The danger of UV rays is what they do to our DNA. Exposure to UV doses over time could cause mutations leading to uncontrolled cell growth or cancer.

So you have to ask yourself - is a tan worth it? If you like the bronzed look, there are sunless tanning lotions or sprays. Use them along with regular checkups by your doctor and you are on your way to better health.

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Nemours, established in 1936 by philanthropist Alfred I. duPont, is dedicated to improving the health and spirit of children. Today, as part of its continuing mission, Nemours supports the operation of a number of renowned children's health facilities throughout the nation, including the Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, Delaware, and the Nemours Children's Clinics throughout Florida. Nemours also supports important clinical research aimed at translating advances in science into practical ways of improving health care for infants, children, and teens. Their website provides useful information on a variety of issues for children and teens including tanning.For More Information...

The Sun Safety Alliance(SSA) is a nonprofit coalition dedicated to the task of reducing the incidence of skin cancer in America. The Alliance, founded by the National Association of Chain Drug Stores and Coppertone® Suncare Products. Their Mission is to significantly reduce the incidence of skin cancer in the United States by motivating people to actively adopt and practice safe sun behavior. The Sun Safety Alliance has been awarded two prestigious Gold Triangle Awards from the American Academy of Dermatology for the SSA's efforts to promote awareness of sun safety to prevent skin cancer.For More Information...

US Food and Drug Administration publishes a newsletter, "the FDA and You," with articles on a variety health and safety issues including tanning and tanning beds.For More Information...

The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) has endorsed the World Health Organization's Recommendation to Restrict Tanning Bed Use.For More Information...

The AAD also reported that Research Shows Popularity of Indoor Tanning Contributes to Increased Incidence of Skin Cancer.For More Information...

The AAD have held forums to report that Indoor Tanning carries all the dangers of the outdoor sun, including skin cancer.For More Information...

 
 

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