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Radio Shows | Centenarians and 100th | mp3wmawav

I hope I feel this good when I reach a hundred…

"When" you reach a hundred? We'd be lucky just to get there! But if we do, We'd join a growing number of Americans reaching that milestone. You know Dave… Medical Discovery News has its own milestone today. This is our one hundredth episode.

That's why we're dedicating this one to all the centenarians out there who're doing a better job of aging than most of us. So why do we age anyway? Believe it or not, scientists don't agree on one answer.

That's right. There are two main schools of thought. One says aging is natural while the other says aging is the accumulated damage to our cells and tissues over time.

There is evidence that aging is encoded in our genes. The very fact that mutations in certain genes can extend life suggests age is programmed. Plus, all species — like man — seem to have an average life span.

The second school of thought is a bit more complex. One part involves free radicals which are a by product of normal cellular functions like when our bodies create energy. In that process, unstable molecules are created which over time, prevent essential molecules like DNA and proteins from functioning properly.

Plus environmental exposure to UV rays, radiation, chemical mutagens as well as errors when our cells divide can lead to the accumulation of genetic damage over time. So, without the secret to eternal youth, we'll share a few tips from the wise. Hendrikje van Andel-Schipper, who died at 115, thanked her diet of pickled herrings while at 116, Kamato Hongo of Japan recommended green tea. The oldest person ever, Jeanne Louise Calment, who died in 1997 at 122 says her secret was a daily glass of port.

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For more information…

An excellent article from Boston Unviersity School of Medicine also includes many links for more information. If you are a centenarian, there are studies you can participate in and if you're not, there is a link to a life expectancy calculator among many other interesting links.
For more information…

There is a website that highlights living people in their 90's (nonagenarians) and 100's (centenarians) who were noted in some field during their lifetimes, for example, the arts, sports, science, politics, etc. While some of the names may be familiar to you others won't be but represent some interesting lives.
For more information…

The National Geographic Magazine has a wonderful multimedia website entitled the "The Secrets of Living Longer" at their website.
For more information…


For a report on dietary restriction and its influence on longevity…

The results of a telephone of 100 U.S. centenarians revealed their top 10 tips for healthy aging.
For more information…

 
 

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